Media Coverage of My Book

The Death and Life of the Single-Family House: Lessons from Vancouver on Building a Livable City (winner of the John Porter Tradition of Excellence Book Award from the CSA) has now been covered by:

BOOK REVIEWS (as of Aug 2nd, 2017)

  • BOOK REVIEW: Canadian Journal of Urban Research 26(1) – Summer 2017 – Joshua Evans
  • BOOK REVIEW: Choice 54(10) – June Issue (2017) – M. Gunter, Jr.
  • BOOK REVIEW: Spacing Vancouver (Feb 14, 2017) – Yuri Artibise
  • BOOK REVIEW: New York Journal of Books (Nov 28, 2016) – Marilyn Gates

TV/RADIO/PODCAST (as of Apr 29th, 2016)

  • Science for the People (podcast, Apr 28, 2017) – Interview with Rachelle Saunders
  • Metropolis (Metro podcast, Nov 28, 2016) – Interview with Luke Simcoe & Matt Elliott
  • Arts on Air (CiTR 101.9, UBC Arts podcast, Nov 28, 2016) – Interview with Rachel Sanders & Brittany Duggan
  • C-FAX Radio (1070 AM, Victoria, Nov 7, 2016) – Interview with Adam Stirling
  • CBC Radio (The 180, Oct 30, 2016) – Interview with Jim Brown
  • Global TV (Global News at Noon BC, Oct 21, 2016) – interview with Sophie Lui (re-posted Jan 19, 2017, in support of piece on home prices)
  • Business News Network TV (Oct 14, 2016) – interview
  • CKNW/Omni Radio (The Jon McComb Show, Oct. 12, 2016) – interview with Jon McComb
  • Vancouver Real Estate Podcast (Oct 5, 2016) – interview with Matt and Adam Scalena
  • CBC Radio (On the Coast, Aug 11, 2016) – interview with Stephen Quinn [listen to just my clip here]

PRINT/ON-LINE (as of Jan 6th, 2017)

 

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Pre-sale Media Coverage: The Death and Life of the Single-Family House

A few local media outlets have picked up interest in my book since I announced it was available for pre-sale on twitter and this blog.  On the one hand, this is great!  I really welcome the exposure for both the book and the ideas it contains.  On the other hand, I worry (together with my publisher’s media rep) about too much early exposure before the book is actually available (October!).  I don’t really know what the right balance is – we don’t get a lot of media training in academia – but I’ll keep working on figuring it out.  In the meantime, I ask for patience from interested reporters with my ham-fisted efforts to manage the roll out of the book and its ideas, and I’m hopeful interest continues into when the book is actually ready to fall into readers’ hands.

For now here’s the audio clip from a recent interview talking about my forthcoming book with Stephen Quinn on CBC’s On The Coast.  (Or you can just listen to the whole August 11th, 2016 show).  I’m a regular listener, so it was really fun to meet Stephen Quinn and Amy Bell and see the inside of the CBC studio. [Update: and here’s the CBC write-up].

Prior to the radio interview, Jen St. Denis also interviewed me about the book for the Metro News, in a nice little piece posted here.  I think the piece was good, but it’s worth making two quick clarifications:

1) The 80% of land base figure speaks to 80% of land set aside to support residential uses (rather than 80% of all land as a whole), and covers the municipality of Vancouver. Metro Vancouver has data on land use broken down by municipality (and a lot of other data besides!)  Also Jens von Bergmann over at MountainMath (mentioned in the piece) has a beautiful map breaking down land use by lot within the City of Vancouver, which everyone should check out.  It really demonstrates just how much land has been set aside for single-family detached houses (almost entirely in protected RS zones, though there are also duplexes in RT zones and houses in Shaughnessy included, along with a scattering of old houses remaining in places unprotected by zoning).

2) The accompanying photo for the piece, as multiple people have pointed out, looks like it was taken at Mole Hill, which is a lovely little development preserving and rehabilitating old houses downtown by subdividing them up into apartments.  To be clear, the census would not consider these to be single-family detached houses, nor would the city.  But the ambiguity of how they LOOK like houses (and very photogenic ones at that) is really interesting.  This speaks to the focus of my first chapter in the book, laying out just what we talk about when we talk about single-family detached houses, and how the legal categories don’t always match people’s lay understandings of what counts as a house.  It also speaks to the many possibilities for subdividing existing houses to support more households – if zoning laws were modified to allow such a thing (it’s already the case, of course, that most RS zoned lots in Vancouver can now already support up to three households through secondary suite and laneway housing provisions).

 

Participate in the 2016 Symposium on Housing Research in BC

The Pacific Housing Research Network (PHRN) is a collection of scholars and practitioners in the field of housing in British Columbia [full disclosure: I sit on the steering committee]. It’s a great organization to be a part of, and I’ve really enjoyed and benefited from all the connections I’ve made through the Network. For the last couple of years, they’ve been working together with the BC Non-Profit Housing Conference to bring greater exposure to local housing research.  Just out now is their Call for Abstracts for those interested in participating in the November, 2016 PHRN research symposium.

PHRN is seeking housing research and examples of promising practices from community-based practitioners, academics (including graduate students), and government researchers from across housing sectors (i.e., policy, technical, cultural, health, social services, political, economic, social) who will help draw the connections between research and practice in creating affordable housing. The Symposium will include research presentations, panel discussions, and networking opportunities.

See the full details here!  Submissions due June 1st!